Archive for the ‘Cognition’ Category

Why robots will be smarter than humans by 2029 +/- months

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Technological Singularity

Today I came across an article posted on Robohub.org titled, Why robots will not be smarter than humans by 2029. The author, Alan Winfield, points out several reasons why. Displeased with his views I thought I’d comment on his comments.

Dr. Winfield,
After reviewing your comments, it’s clear you do not understand the technological singularity thesis. Yes, in the past few days we’ve seen a spate of headlines boasting about Ray Kurzweil’s 2029 date for the birth of true Artificial Intelligence (AI) (Technological Singularity). As much as I respect your credentials, when it comes to your article, Why robots will not be smarter than humans by 2029, I think you are profoundly wrong, and here are several point-to-point reasons why:

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Review: Reflections on Abstractions for General Artificial Intelligence

Wednesday, February 5th, 2014
Newell (1990) Unified Theories of Cognition

Newell (1990)

Initially, when I first read the abstract of Laird’s article I was turn off, mostly because he cites Newell (1990) – it just seems so old school.

It’s been almost 25 years since Newell’s Unified Theories of Cognition, but I’m glad I continued reading because there is much I like about this short article.

When I first got into AI, I was kind of obsessed with symbolic cognitive architectures, thinking they had much potential to achieve General Artificial Intelligence. But the more I researched the more I realized how much cognitive architectures:

a) neglected the mind, body, environment model

b) focused too much on high level cognitive functions, like language

With respect to “a”, I believe, an ecological approach to AI is paramount. That is, we should be focusing our research on perception and action.

With respect to “b”, it seems like symbolic cognitive architectures were trying to solve high level functions when they haven’t solved low level functions, ie. perception and action.

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Research & Blog Update

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

Graph
I have taken a slight change in direction with regards to the form of my MA thesis. Before, pretty much all of last year, I was being pressured to develop an empirical research project. Now, due to events I will not discuss here, I am happy to announce I will be writing a theoretical thesis! I am thrilled about this and found new inspiration and motivation.

I created this blog as a means to motivate myself and as a means to document and share my research. I am trying hard not to lose focus of this fact. My last post, An Education Transformation: How technology transformed a bedwetter into a superhero, received many comments and I thank all of you who took the time and energy to comment. In the future I will try to incorporate more of the same elements, intimacy and humour, into my more technical posts.

In this post I will outline things to come, basically the topics I plan to cover and the direction I plan to take within the next few months. First, there are two topics that have been brewing in my mind, and I’m eager to get those thoughts out of my head and onto this blog: education & consciousness. Here is a quick preview… (more…)

Comments on Ben Goertzel’s post: vision vs. touch / kinesthetics

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

visionRecently I came across a blurb by Ben Goertzel1 titled, vision vs. touch/kinesthetics.

This short blog post questions the importance of vision in AI research.

I had an urge to comment on his post, and these are my comments:

Touch and kinesthesis2 are important elements for all animal intelligence – not just human intelligence. However, if we rely just on our bodies to perceive our environment then our perceived world would be very small. Vision, as well as the sense of smell and the sense of hearing, gives us a means to perceive the world at a safe distance. That is, vision allows us to extend our perception of the world beyond our physical bodies.

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  1. Ben Goertzel is a researcher with similar research interests
  2. kinesthesis – the ability to feel movements of the limbs and body.

A Cognitive Architecture Primer

Saturday, October 9th, 2010

Cognitive ArchitectureThe expression cognitive architecture, like the name implies, is an architecture of cognition. Cognition, in this context, refers to any thought process (i.e., perception, memory, learning or language). Architecture, also in this context, can be seen as a computational blueprint or computation model, the blueprint being a diagram which lays out the framework of computational construction (set of rules to follow). Basically, a blueprint gives all the information one needs in order to build the structure, in this case a cognitive task. In this sense, a cognitive architecture is a metaphorical blueprint that illustrates the essential structures and relationships of different components that make up how we think. Hence, for the purpose of this post, a cognitive architecture is any theoretical or practical system that attempts to explain or simulate the broad range of human thought processes.

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A Cognitive Designer’s Research Blog

Thursday, September 23rd, 2010

Welcome to the Cognitive Designer’s blog; the research blog of Lexx Lazerman.

This is my first post. Things are not quite set up yet but you can check out the Author & Research; page to see if this blog is for you, or just register and I will send you an email when this site is fully operational. Feel free to post a comment.

Have a great day,

Lexx

🙂